Event Title

High Quality Ignorance, or Awareness of Lack of Knowledge, Begets a Curious, Questioning, Problem-Posing Disposition: Shaping the Critical-Conscious Mind of College Students

Location

Hawkins Hall, Room 153D

Start Date

1-10-2016 10:00 AM

End Date

1-10-2016 11:00 AM

Description

Today’s college students are arriving on campus without the necessary skills and dispositions to be successful (Gabriel, 2008). In additional to critical thinking, creativity, and continual learning, a disposition of high quality ignorance is required. High quality ignorance means acknowledging that human beings do not possess all knowledge, that knowledge is infinite, and that pursuing knowledge is a perpetual act. Instructional strategies to promote high quality ignorance will be discussed.

Comments

Dr. Squires is an associate professor in Teacher Education at SUNY Plattsburgh. She earned a C.A.S. in Educational Leadership (2008) and Ed.D. in Educational Theory and Practice (2011) from Binghamton University, an M.S.Ed. in Special Education (2003) from LeMoyne College, and a B.A. in English (2001) with a concentration in Secondary Education from Nazareth College. She taught English for five years at LaFayette Junior/Senior High School before entering higher education. Dr. Squires’ current research interests include teacher preparation, special education, and Native American education.

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Oct 1st, 10:00 AM Oct 1st, 11:00 AM

High Quality Ignorance, or Awareness of Lack of Knowledge, Begets a Curious, Questioning, Problem-Posing Disposition: Shaping the Critical-Conscious Mind of College Students

Hawkins Hall, Room 153D

Today’s college students are arriving on campus without the necessary skills and dispositions to be successful (Gabriel, 2008). In additional to critical thinking, creativity, and continual learning, a disposition of high quality ignorance is required. High quality ignorance means acknowledging that human beings do not possess all knowledge, that knowledge is infinite, and that pursuing knowledge is a perpetual act. Instructional strategies to promote high quality ignorance will be discussed.